Built into a hill, this concrete and glass fixer costs $ 99,900

This renovator in the woods shows what can happen when a stonemason builds a house with the vision to use the energy of the earth. But don’t quite finish the job.

The current owner built the house on Miner Street in Warsaw, NY, from concrete and glass in 1980, and slashed it into the hill. It’s listed for just $ 99,900 and needs some serious work to update it.

There are different ways for a buyer to configure the sheltered structure of the land.

“One of the first plans he had was that it would be built as an apartment complex”, explains the listing agent, Rodney Heale.

Instead, the owner ended up moving into part of the structure and left the rest unfinished. Other projects vied for his attention, and he was never able to devote his full attention to the place.

“Being a bricklayer by trade, he would go out and finish everyone else’s projects, and then it was kind of his baby to do on his own,” Heale says. “As with other entrepreneurs, not all of them complete some of the projects they do on their own. It would be the classic example.

Outside

(Jason Beck)

Outside

(Jason Beck)

Food

(Jason Beck)

Living space

(Jason Beck)

Living space

(Jason Beck)

Finite space

(Jason Beck)

Bedroom

(Jason Beck)

Bathroom

(Jason Beck)

Unfinished space

(Jason Beck)

Unfinished space

(Jason Beck)

Unfinished space

(Jason Beck)

Unfinished space

(Jason Beck)

One side of the structure is a wall of windows facing nature, but the rear sinks directly into the earth, which is part of the roof.

Heale told us that the rubber membrane between the concrete and the earth needed some repairs. Even so, the earth helps the structure to maintain a constant temperature.

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“On a day like today, at the right time in the afternoon, you could open those interior windows and just by letting in some of this natural heat that was captured, the temperature would rise by 2 to 5 degrees”, he says.

When it comes to finished spaces, the home has four bedrooms and two bathrooms over 2,336 square feet. Everything inside could use a refresh.

The rustic kitchen has custom bricks and several living areas fitted with radiant heat, baseboard heaters, and other technology. Another 600 square foot unfinished space is ready to be personalized by the new owners.

Finite space

(Jason Beck)

The next steps are not clear, but the concrete hillside house is living space.

“Everyone is subject to their own opinion as to what is ready to move in,” says Heale. “Some would look at it and say, ‘We can live in this part here, and we’re going to slowly change some of the things around, and then eventually end up. [it] disabled. ‘ Then there are other people who come in and say, “Oh my God, I should spend a ton of money on this property to make it the way I want it to be.”

Outside

(Jason Beck)

The home sits on nearly 1.5 acres of wooded land in the village of Warsaw, NY, about an hour southeast of Buffalo.

“It’s on a dead end road, so there are only a few other properties there,” Heale says. “There really isn’t any other building option there, so it’s very isolated, but you’re inside the village, so you still have water and public sewers.”

He says the house is quiet from the concrete and dirt, but bright, thanks to all the windows.

Due to the roofing problem and the necessary repairs, securing traditional financing has been difficult. Heale and the owner are looking for a cash buyer.

It will also require a buyer with vision and talent.

“In the description, I put unique as one of the first words, ‘unique contemporary’,” he says. “Someone has to come in and finish it.”

Outside

(Jason Beck)

Unfinished space

(Jason Beck)

Unfinished space

(Jason Beck)

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