Camping UK: A woman opens her garden to campers in Liverpool | Travel News | Travel

For many, going camping conjures up images of the great outdoors, mountains, valleys, lakes and even cities. Vacationers in need of a location can camp in people’s gardens, with both sides apparently finding something to celebrate.

For tourists, it’s a cheap alternative to town, but what do the owners get, other than a few pounds?

A Liverpool mother of three rented her garden on a popular ‘almost wild camping’ platform.

The principle is quite simple to understand, it is the back garden version of Airbnb.

In Liverpool, the woman said she was doing “Airbnb too”.

So what makes someone open the front doors and let people pitch their tents in their backyards?

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She said: “I started doing it because there is nowhere to camp in Liverpool. You know people are traveling across the UK and then you come into the towns and there is nowhere to go.

With plenty of accommodations, most cities don’t have any camping options other than hotels, Airbnbs, and hostels.

That doesn’t stop more companies from getting into what they see as a trend, with the latest addition to the ‘almost wild camping’ space Wildpoint, a website launched this year after raising a lot of capital. seed money from investors.

Camping in cities, while safe on someone’s property, is not the most popular option for a city break, even when it’s readily available.

The woman said: “I’ve had a few people over the years, but not that many. About fifteen groups, that’s all.

The British are not flocking to settle in each other’s backyards, the majority of campers being tourists from overseas.

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She continued, “The last ones were all international people. Very rarely are they English.

“Mainly people who are here on vacation and on tour in the UK. They are used to camping. I guess the Brits don’t think about camping in the city.”

For the Scouser, it all started with “an article in the newspaper on how to make some extra money.” There was parkonmydrive.com and campinmygarden.com… But over the years, it has mostly become a way to help people.

For most Brits, the idea of ​​sharing their living spaces with strangers might seem like a nightmare, but the hostess wouldn’t agree: “I like meeting people, that’s why I do it. do.

However, this did not happen without some unusual experiences, she continued.

Although she is happy that people come and stay, some “have been a bit of a pain.”

One group in particular forgot their tent: “I had a group of four guys without a tent and they were a bit of a pain.
“I think they knew they were supposed to bring one. But of course I had to let them in and sleep in the living room.”

The woman was forced to let the group stay indoors after initially booking camping.

Another struggled to make the payment, but the hostess was happy to adjust.

“There was a guy who was leaving Liverpool airport in the morning and just needed a place to stay,” she continued.

“I think back then it was £ 7 a night but he struggled to get that £ 7 for me and in the end I just said ‘forget it. “”

Not everyone is as understanding as she is. Her sons are definitely not fans, but she used the money as a sweetener: “Originally, when I started doing it, they hated it. I used to say, ‘I’m going to put all the money aside and we’ll share it among all of us at Christmas.’ “

Just because people stay in the garden doesn’t stop the Scousers from enjoying life.

She still uses the space for socializing and eating: “I once had friends here, about 20 of us in the garden having a meal, then there is a tent, with a couple. sitting and reading a book. Everyone says, “who are these people? “

If opening your garden to tourists can give rise to surreal situations and funny stories to tell, everything stopped with the Covid: “I haven’t had anyone for a year and a half, maybe two years now . “

This does not prevent him from having people around: “I used to do Airbnb and obviously everything has stopped for the moment, so I have a tenant instead.

“Even now I walk away and thought, someone is going to my room while I’m away for three days. I don’t like ruined beds! ”

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