Home Prices of $ 325,000 in S. St. Pete Raise Affordable Housing Concerns

Affordable housing is a hot topic and we learn even more about it after hearing from you, our viewers.


What would you like to know

  • Spectrum Bay News 9 ran an article highlighting $ 325,000 worth of homes sold in predominantly black, low-income neighborhood of South St. Pete
  • After the story aired, viewer Charles Sorensen contacted us
  • He said his dream of owning a house seemed out of reach
  • Sorensen said he was not the only one with regard to the natives of St. Pete and Pinellas County leaving the area for affordable housing.

Spectrum Bay News 9 ran an article highlighting $ 325,000 worth of homes sold in a predominantly black, low-income neighborhood of South St. Pete.

Charles Sorensen saw the story and reached out to share the impact of rising house prices on his family.

“This affordable housing is not fair verbiage,” he said.

Sorensen was born and raised in St. Pete and he has seen house prices rise over the years, pushing people like him to other towns in the county. But now he is being pushed even further. He is concerned that the same will be done to the people who live in South St. Pete.

He asked: “Impoverished people or people with certain financial means were forced to this side of town, now we are evicted?

“It’s like we’re moving through the wrong part of town to allow ourselves where we can where we’re pushed, and then as soon as we’re pushed out there it’s like you’re pushing a caged dog away. and you take the cage off, “he said. “No, we are going to fight now.”

The announcement prompted many reactions, including from a Pinellas County commissioner.

The dedicated husband and electrician said rising house prices affected him and he was only renting. He said his dream of owning a house seemed out of reach.

“It was a struggle. I was recently told I had to move because Airbnb was going to give my landlord $ 2,000 for $ 1,300, ”he said. “I can’t afford to buy but I go to a rental and while I’m there for rental someone comes and says hey, can I buy it? Well sorry I’m not here so I have to walk away, there is no conversation.

Sorensen said he was not the only one when it came to St. Pete and Pinellas County natives leaving the area for affordable housing. After looking for and fearful of homelessness, his wife was able to find the couple an affordable apartment, but it is in the neighboring county.

Sorensen said his fight to live in Pinellas County again is far from over.

“Is anyone going to defend the blue collar workers who go to work every day and work in duplicate every day, seven days a week?” He said. “I’m going to get to the bottom of this. Someone has to answer for that.

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