Key workers forced out of UK holiday hotspots as landlords evict tenants to put property on Airbnb

Key workers are being forced out of some of Britain’s most popular vacation spots as landlords kick tenants out to put their properties on Airbnb in an attempt to take advantage of the so-called ‘stay boom’.

A combination of the Covid pandemic, reductions in stamp duties and stays have triggered an unprecedented housing crisis in Cornwall, Devon, Norfolk and Cumbria as residents find themselves homeless due to soaring housing prices real estate and national holidays.

Anthony Mangnall, Tory MP for Totnes, set to declare a ‘housing emergency’ by fall in South Hams, an area of ​​outstanding natural beauty in Devon with over 5,000 residences secondary.

He is one of many MPs preparing to ask Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick to introduce a series of measures to alleviate the crisis.

Mr Mangnall told The Sunday Times: “There are only 19 properties you can rent long term in all of South Hams on Rightmove, but there are 300 advertised on Airbnb in Salcombe, another 300 in Kingsbridge, a number similar to Totnes.

“Yet we have hospital staff who can’t find anywhere to live, RNLI teams who can’t live in the city they serve. It is starting to get dangerous.

In the first six months of 2021, nearly 15,000 second homes have been purchased in Britain according to statistics from Countrywide, the UK’s largest estate agency chain – the highest number since 2009, date at which they started to collect data.

Key workers are being forced out of some of Britain's most popular vacation spots as landlords evict tenants to put their properties on Airbnb in an attempt to take advantage of the so-called 'stay boom'.  Image of Cornwall

Key workers are being forced out of some of Britain’s most popular vacation spots as landlords kick tenants out to put their properties on Airbnb in an attempt to take advantage of the so-called ‘stay boom’. Image of Cornwall

In the first six months of 2021, nearly 15,000 second homes have been purchased in Britain according to statistics from Countrywide, the UK’s largest estate agency chain – the highest number since 2009, date at which they started to collect data.

In parts of the Lake District, northern Norfolk, Devon and Cornwall, up to 80% of homes are considered vacation rentals or second homes, the Sunday Times reported.

Of the eight UK postcodes where house prices have risen by more than £ 100,000 in the past year, three are in Cornwall.

Homes sell for millions of pounds to buyers with seemingly limitless budgets, as major workers struggle to find housing and locals are forced to camp.

Anthony Mangnall, Tory MP for Totnes, to declare a 'housing emergency' in South Hams, an area of ​​outstanding natural beauty in Devon with more than 5,000 second homes, by fall

Anthony Mangnall, Tory MP for Totnes, to declare a ‘housing emergency’ in South Hams, an area of ​​outstanding natural beauty in Devon with more than 5,000 second homes, by fall

The crisis even forced the Bishop of Truro, the Right Reverend Philip Mounstephen, to speak out about the “devastating” effect second homes have on communities in Cornwall.

MPs such as Mr Mangnall, Steve Double, Derek Thomas and Duncan Baker are expected to come up with plans that include regulating Airbnb-style rentals, building more affordable homes, restrictions on the number of vacation homes and second homes, incentives for landlords to rent to residents; and new powers to impose housing tax surcharges on second homes.

Tim Farron, the Liberal Democrat MP for Westmorland and Lonsdale, launched a petition last week calling for changes to planning laws to prevent family homes from being turned into second homes and vacation rentals, warning: ‘The market is completely broken and if we don’t intervene we will see entire populations leave.

Mr Double, the Tory MP for St Austell and Newquay, said there are now around 10,000 Airbnbs in Cornwall.

Mr Thomas, MP for St Ives, West Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly, is also campaigning to charge “a double or triple municipal tax and a fence to subsidize local services”.

Cornwall Council has announced plans to build hundreds of “pop-up” homes for those without a permanent home.

Olly Monk, holder of the Cornwall Council Housing and Planning portfolio, said changes in the housing market in the county this year had been “seismic” and warned: “There is a perfect storm in this. moment in terms of housing supply and demand and it is a worrying time for many people.

A combination of the Covid pandemic, stamp duty cuts and stays have sparked an unprecedented housing crisis in Cornwall, Devon (photo by Clovelly), Norfolk and Cumbria as residents find themselves homeless due to the soaring real estate prices and national holidays

A combination of the Covid pandemic, stamp duty cuts and stays have triggered an unprecedented housing crisis in Cornwall, Devon (photo by Clovelly), Norfolk and Cumbria as residents find themselves homeless due to the soaring real estate prices and national holidays

The Department of Housing, Communities and Local Government told The Sunday Times: “We have introduced a series of measures to help mitigate the negative effects that a large number of second homes can have on certain areas, including higher stamp duty for second home buyers. .

“We have delivered over 542,000 affordable homes since 2010 and are investing over £ 12 billion in affordable housing over the next five years.”

Last year, Princess Anne said there was a shortage of affordable homes in most rural areas. She wrote for Country Life magazine: “One of my pleas … concerns housing for local families that are priced out of the market; for young single people who wish to stay and work in their village or neighborhood of origin; young families; and retirees who were born in the village and would like to return home. ‘

An Airbnb spokesperson told MailOnline: “Airbnb is designed to help locals afford their accommodation and the majority of UK hosts share space in their own homes with almost half of UK hosts claiming the income additional is an economic lifeline.

“We take housing issues seriously and always welcome the opportunity to work with governments on solutions.

“We have already presented the government with proposals for a host registration system following a UK-wide consultation with local authorities and communities, and we are delighted to see the government undertake to consult on the measures as part of its tourism recovery plan. “

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