The world’s cheapest hostels: are they worth it?

Depending on the location, hostels can be an amazing way to save money while exploring on board … But are the budget still worth it?

Everyone loves a good deal and sometimes hotel prices just aren’t enough. When Airbnb isn’t an option, many young travelers turn to hostels. They are socially oriented towards the community, offer adequate sleeping space, and some even offer additional services such as food and drink. And if a traveler can find a hostel with a pool or outdoor space near their travel destination, that’s even better … right?

Everyone has heard horror stories when it comes to hotels, and even Airbnb has had its share of drama when it comes to renting a space. But hostels are a whole different mix because they are usually much more affordable, so how do you decide if that low and low price is worth it? By taking a look at some of the cheaper hostels around and seeing what the reviews are saying.


The dreamer in Colombia

Columbia has a lot to see and do, especially near Cartagena, and it can be made even easier with a good place to rest at night. The Dreamer, starting at just over six dollars a night, offers a garden, a large swimming pool, a built-in bar, and even a restaurant that serves Italian cuisine.

the dream hostel in colombia

via Booking.com

That’s already way more than what a traveler would normally get at a hostel, well worth the $ 6.73 you’d pay per night. It is also within a reasonable distance of several natural park sites, while still being considered one of the most social hostels in the country with its common areas.

Flow Hostel in Budapest

There are several wonderful hotels in Budapest that offer comfortable beds, breakfast with a view, and fun amenities. However, when it comes to saving money in Budapest, a hostel is the place to be.

the kitchen of the flow hostel in budapest

via Pinterest

The good thing about Flow is that it’s a newer hostel, bringing new installments and fresh paint as opposed to some older options. In the hostel’s rooms, visitors will also find that their beds have curtains for privacy, but that’s not all this cool space offers.

It is also in a fantastic location in the city and within walking distance of Budapest’s central market. So while there might not be so much to do in the hostel, there is certainly plenty to do right outside, all for $ 7.85 per night.

Bananas in Thailand

the banana inn in thailand

via Bangkok, the best hostels

The name sounds a bit odd, but for $ 9.31 a night it’s worth putting up with some banana jokes. The location of this hostel is what makes it so amazing – visitors will be surrounded by the lush greenery of Thailand and truly have the opportunity to disconnect and enjoy the scenery.

the view of banana inn in thailand

via Airbnb, Booking.com

Options for travelers also include shared dorms and bungalows, which are private rooms. Visitors will find hammocks to relax in nearby and can even stop by the inn’s kitchen, where the chef is renowned for her authentic Thai cuisine.

Related: 5 Signs Your Hostel is a Winner (5 You Should Book Elsewhere)

The cheapest: the Garden Village guesthouse in Cambodia

the garden village inn in cambodia

via telegraph

While these hostels are all incredibly inexpensive, it’s the Garden Village Guesthouse that really wins the savings game. The problem is, travelers have found that the low price doesn’t necessarily mean it’s always worth it.

For dollar dorms (yes, you read that right), travelers can expect a bed, towel, and mosquito net … Upgrades (single and deluxe rooms) are available for a price consistently lower than $ 20.

However, the dorms are next to the kitchen, which can mean various noises and smells, and there is free wifi in public areas, laundry service, volleyball court, affordable bike rental, affordable rooftop bar and restaurant.

Next: 10 Hostels From Around The World That Could Be Better Than A Hotel

various india foods

India is divided into four zones with four varieties of delicious food, here is what they are


About the Author

Comments are closed.